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Arthritis Help

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Herbs

 

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There are many Natural Things
you can do for your Arthritis

Arthritis and Surgery

 

Although medications are the first defense against Arthritis pain and swelling, if they fail to solve the problem, many doctors will suggest a surgical measure. Whenever someone is considering a surgical procedure, he or she should consult a physician for expressing concerns and gathering information. 

During this time, you should discuss all of the any potential risks involved with the procedure as well as all of the alternative measures.  However, if a decision is made to continue with the surgery, the doctor will recommend a procedure that he feels is best suited for the patient’s condition and then will explain what that procedure entails. Note that sometimes before surgery, doctors prescribe blood-thinning medication and advise you to do various joint movement activities or exercises in order to increase circulation

Some benefits of going the surgery route can include the stabilization, improved alignment or replacement of a joint so that you can have greater mobility, flexibility, overall use and range-of-motion. Surgery may also be able to provide some level of Arthritis pain relief where other treatment options might have failed.

Be aware there are possible risks with surgery, though, like blood clots resulting. And your healthcare specialist may advise against surgery if, for example, you have existing health problems that could pose possible unwanted risks. Some of these problems could include sickness or infections that would need to be healed first, being over weight, which could cause more stress and delayed recovery, lung problems or heart disease.

Common types of surgery used in the treatment of Arthritis follow:

Arthrodesis –

This is the joining together or fusion of joint bones. Arthrodesis helps stop the progression of the disease at the point of fusion, ending the pain. Loss of the joint’s flexibility can result. However, the area will be better able to handle weight and offer general movement. In other words, the joint may not be 360-degree-flexible any longer, but there will be some lesser-degree of flexibility overall without pain.

Arthroplasty –

This is the replacement or rebuilding of an entire joint. And it is intended for those with high-level pain and movement impairment. It is discussed in much more detail in the section immediately following this one, offering a focus with regards to hip replacement.

Arthroscopy –

Growing more popular with the improved use of technology, this procedure is when specialized instruments are inserted into the joint by means of tiny incisions. During this surgery, the operating physician has helping staff members who aid the computerized monitoring and some handling of the instruments. The doctor can see the joint on closed-circuit television and make repairs to it, while talking through a microphone. Then not only are there physical results, but the patient has a video with audio record of the entire occurrence for insurance and other records. Arthroscopy is often performed on an outpatient basis. And recovery time is generally much less than with other “open” surgery.

Osteotomy -

This is a medical procedure that makes an actual cut in the bone, most generally to correct youth deformities like in the knee or hip. Osteotomy helps with re-alignment, stabilization, pain relief and the delaying of joint replacement alternatives for up to 10 years.

Synovectomy –

This procedure, generally done via arthroscopy, involves the removal of diseased joint tissue lining or synovium. Results can include swelling decrease, pain relief, improved but not completely healed joint health.